Specific hippocampal atrophy early sign of MCI & Alzheimer's

January, 2010
  • People with MCI who later developed Alzheimer's disease showed 10-30% greater brain atrophy in two specific regions.

A three-year study involving 169 people with mild cognitive impairment has found that those who later developed Alzheimer's disease showed 10-30% greater atrophy in two specific locations within the hippocampus, the cornu ammonis (CA1) and the subiculum. A second study comparing the brains of 10 cognitively normal elderly people and seven who were diagnosed with MCI between two and three years after their initial brain scan and with Alzheimer's some seven years after the initial scan, has confirmed the same pattern of hippocampal atrophy, from the CA1 to the subiculum, and then other regions of the hippocampus.

Reference: 

Apostolova, L.G. et al. In press. Subregional hippocampal atrophy predicts Alzheimer's dementia in the cognitively normal. Neurobiology of Aging, Available online 24 September 2008.

[392] Apostolova, L. G., Thompson P. M., Green A. E., Hwang K. S., Zoumalan C., Jack, Jr C. R., et al.
(2010).  3D comparison of low, intermediate, and advanced hippocampal atrophy in MCI.
Human Brain Mapping. 9999(9999), NA - NA.

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