Multimorbidity score linked to cognitive decline

  • A very large study found that older adults with multiple health conditions showed much greater cognitive decline than those with fewer chronic conditions, even when the conditions weren't directly related to brain health.

Data from more than 14,265 people older adults (51+) multiple times over a decade or more through the University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study has found that people with higher “multimorbidity scores” showed much faster cognitive decline than those with lower scores, even though most of the chronic conditions included in the index had no direct relationship with brain health. The higher the score, the faster the decline.

The multimorbidity index was calculated using three long-term studies of more than 250,000 health professionals, and takes into account the different ways different conditions affect people and how they interact.

The tool is free and available at the ePrognosis website for clinicians.

https://www.futurity.org/multimorbidity-score-chronic-conditions-death-2089922-2/

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