Video games help stroke victims recover motor function

March, 2010

A pilot study suggests that video games for the Nintendo Wii could help stroke victims recover fine and gross motor function after a stroke.

A pilot study suggests that video games for the Nintendo Wii could help stroke victims recover fine motor function (such as finger dexterity) and gross motor function (such as arm movements) two months after a stroke. The ten patients randomly assigned to playing these games for about six hours over the course of two weeks showed significantly better recovery, and none of the adverse effects (like nausea or dizziness) that were reported in the other group assigned to recreational games such as cards or the block-stacking game Jenga. A clinical trial is now underway.

Reference: 

The research was presented February 25 at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference.

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