Personality changes during transition to MCI

  • Behavioral and personality changes seen in those with Alzheimer's appear to be reflected in very early increases in neuroticism and declines in openness.

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a precursor of Alzheimer's disease, although having MCI does not mean you are definitely going to progress to Alzheimer's. A new study suggests that one sign of MCI development might be personality changes.

The study involved 277 cognitively healthy residents of a U.S. County, who had the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4 gene (otherwise known as the ‘Alzheimer’s gene’). Over the study period (around 7 years), 25 developed MCI. Their performance on the Neuroticism, Extraversion, and Openness Personality Inventory—Revised (delivered at the beginning of the study, as well as at other times during the study) was compared with that of the other 252 participants.

Neuroticism increased significantly more in those developing MCI, and openness decreased more. Those developing MCI also showed significantly greater depression, somatization, irritability, anxiety, and aggressive attitude. (Somatization refers to the tendency to generate physical manifestations in response to psychological distress.)

While such personality changes may be barely noticeable at this stage, it may be that diagnosing such early personality changes could help experts develop earlier, safer, and more effective treatments — or even prevention options — for the more severe types of behavior challenges that affect people with Alzheimer's disease.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-01/ags-pcd012318.php

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