Negative emotion can enhance memory for tested information

September, 2011

Images designed to arouse strong negative emotion can improve your memory for information you’re learning, if presented immediately after you’ve been tested on it.

In a recent study, 40 undergraduate students learned ten lists of ten pairs of Swahili-English words, with tests after each set of ten. On these tests, each correct answer was followed by an image, either a neutral one or one designed to arouse negative emotions, or by a blank screen. They then did a one-minute multiplication test before moving on to the next section.

On the final test of all 100 Swahili-English pairs, participants did best on items that had been followed by the negative pictures.

In a follow-up experiment, students were shown the images two seconds after successful retrieval. The results were the same.

In the final experiment, the section tests were replaced by a restudying period, where each presentation of a pair was followed by an image or blank screen. The effect did not occur, demonstrating that the effect depends on retrieval.

The study focused on negative emotion because earlier research has found no such memory benefit for positive images (including images designed to be sexually arousing).

The findings emphasize the importance of the immediate period after retrieval, suggesting that this is a fruitful time for manipulations that enhance or impair memory. This is consistent with the idea of reconsolidation — that when information is retrieved from memory, it is in a labile state, able to be changed. Thus, by presenting a negative image when the retrieved memory is still in that state, the memory absorbs some of that new context.

Reference: 

[2340] Finn B, Roediger HL. Enhancing Retention Through Reconsolidation. Psychological Science [Internet]. 2011 ;22(6):781 - 786. Available from: http://pss.sagepub.com/content/22/6/781.abstract

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