Mothers influence how children develop advanced cognitive functions

February, 2010

A study of 80 pairs of middle-income Canadian mothers and their year-old babies has revealed conversational strategies that are associated with better executive skills among toddlers.

A study of 80 pairs of middle-income Canadian mothers and their year-old babies has revealed that children of mothers who answered their children's requests for help quickly and accurately; talked about their children's preferences, thoughts, and memories during play; and encouraged successful strategies to help solve difficult problems, performed better at a year and a half and 2 years on tasks that call for executive skills, compared to children whose mothers didn't use these techniques.

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