How mindset can improve vision

April, 2010

An intriguing set of experiments has showed how you can improve vision by manipulating mindset.

An intriguing set of experiments showing how you can improve perception by manipulating mindset found significantly improved vision when:

  • an eye chart was arranged in reverse order (the letters getting progressively larger rather than smaller);
  • participants were given eye exercises and told their eyes would improve with practice;
  • participants were told athletes have better vision, and then told to perform jumping jacks or skipping (seen as less athletic);
  • participants flew a flight simulator, compared to pretending to fly a supposedly broken simulator (pilots are believed to have good vision).

Reference: 

[158] Langer E, Djikic M, Pirson M, Madenci A, Donohue R. Believing Is Seeing. Psychological Science [Internet]. 2010 ;21(5):661 - 666. Available from: http://pss.sagepub.com/content/21/5/661.abstract

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