A diet to delay age-related cognitive decline

More evidence for the benefits of the Mediterranean diet for fighting age-related cognitive decline comes from a large 5-year study. The study involved 960 older adults, whose cognitive change was assessed over 4.7 years. Those who followed the MIND diet more rigorously showed an equivalent of being 7.5 years younger cognitively than those who followed the diet least.

The Mediterranean-DASH Diet Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay is a hybrid of the Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets. It requires at least:

  • three servings of whole grains every day
  • a green leafy vegetable and one other vegetable every day
  • a glass of wine
  • snack most days on nuts
  • beans every other day or so
  • poultry at least twice a week
  • fish at least once a week
  • berries at least twice a week (blueberries are particularly recommended)
  • very limited intake of designated unhealthy foods, especially:
    • butter
    • sweets and pastries
    • whole fat cheese
    • fried or fast food

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-08/rumc-eaa080415.php

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/aug/05/diet-high-in-leafy-green-vegetables-may-slow-cognitive-decline-in-elderly-study

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