Diabetes & MCI linked in middle age

September, 2014

A large study has found that mild cognitive impairment occurred twice as often in older adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

A German study involving 1,936 older adults (50+) has found that mild cognitive impairment (MCI) occurred twice as often in those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Analysis of 560 participants with MCI (289 with amnestic MCI and 271 with non-amnestic MCI) and 1,376 cognitively normal participants revealed that this was only observed in middle-aged participants (50-65), not in older participants (65-80). Interestingly, there was a gender difference. Middle-aged women showed a stronger association between diabetes and amnestic MCI, while middle-aged men showed a stronger association with non-amnestic MCI.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-09/ip-dma090214.php

Reference: 

Winkler, A., Dlugaj, M., Weimar, C., Jöckel, K.-H., Erbel, R., Dragano, N., & Moebus, S. (2014). Association of diabetes mellitus and mild cognitive impairment in middle-aged men and women. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease: JAD, 42(4), 1269–1277. http://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-140696

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