Another challenge to idea that men are better at spatial thinking

October, 2011

A cross-cultural study finds a significant gender difference on a simple puzzle problem for one culture but no gender difference for another. The difference was only partly explained by education.

Here’s an intriguing approach to the long-standing debate about gender differences in spatial thinking. The study involved 1,279 adults from two cultural groups in India. One of these groups was patrilineal, the other matrilineal. The volunteers were given a wooden puzzle to assemble as quickly as they could.

Within the patrilineal group, men were on average 36% faster than women. Within the matrilineal group, however, there was no difference between the genders.

I have previously reported on studies showing how small amounts of spatial training can close the gap in spatial abilities between the genders. It has been argued that in our culture, males are directed toward spatial activities (construction such as Lego; later, video games) more than females are.

In this case, the puzzle was very simple. However, general education was clearly one factor mediating this gender difference. In the patrilineal group, males had an average 3.67 more years of education, while in the matrilineal group, men and women had the same amount of education. When education was included in the statistical analysis, a good part of the difference between the groups was accounted for — but not all.

While we can only speculate about the remaining cause, it is interesting to note that, among the patrilineal group, the gender gap was decidedly smaller among those who lived in households not wholly owned by males (in the matrilineal group, men are not allowed to own property, so this comparison cannot be made).

It is also interesting to note that the men in the matrilineal group were faster than the men in the patrilineal group. This is not a function of education differences, because education in the matrilineal group was slightly less than that of males in the patrilineal group.

None of the participants had experience with puzzle solving, and both groups had similar backgrounds, being closely genetically related and living in villages geographically close. Participants came from eight villages: four patrilineal and four matrilineal.

Reference: 

[2519] Hoffman, M., Gneezy U., & List J. A. (2011).  Nurture affects gender differences in spatial abilities. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 108(36), 14786 - 14788.

Recent posts at Mynd

A study involving 97 healthy older adults (65-89) has found that those with the “Alzheimer’s gene” (APOe4) who didn’t...

An Indian study involving 648 dementia patients, of whom 391 were bilingual, has found that, overall, bilingual patients developed dementia 4.5...

A study, involving 371 patients with mild cognitive impairment...

A study involving 206 spousal and adult children caregivers of dementia sufferers (mostly Alzheimer’s) has found that about 84% of...

A study involving 254 people with dementia living at home has found that 99% of people with dementia and 97% of their caregivers had one or more...

A new U.S. study suggests that Alzheimer's disease and other dementias are markedly under-reported on death certificates and medical records....

It’s often argued that telling people that they carry genes increasing their risk of Alzheimer’s will simply upset them to no purpose...

11 new genetic susceptibility factors for Alzheimer’s identified

The largest international study ever conducted on Alzheimer's...

Understanding a protein's role in familial Alzheimer's...

A brain imaging study of 162 healthy babies (2-25 months) has found that those who carried the ApoE4...

A gene linked to Alzheimer's has been linked to brain changes in childhood. This gene, SORL1, has two connections to Alzheimer’s: it...

Analysis of data from 237 patients with mild cognitive impairment...

Two studies indicate that young people carrying the “Alzheimer’s gene” (ApoE4...

Analysis of data from more than 8,000 people, most of them older than 60, has revealed that, among the 5,000 people initially tested cognitively...

Analysis of 700 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative has revealed a genetic mutation (rs4728029) that’s associated...

Analysis of brain scans and cognitive scores of 64 older adults from the NIA's Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (average age 76) has found...