Aerobic exercise preserves brain volume and improves cognition in those with MCI

  • Regular exercise has been found to reduce brain shrinkage in those with mild cognitive impairment.

A study involving 35 adults with MCI found that those who exercised four times a week over a six-month period increased their volume of gray matter. But those who participated in aerobic exercise experienced significantly greater gains than those who just stretched, who also showed signs of white matter loss.

Aerobic activity included treadmill, stationary bike or elliptical training.

The study was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) in November, 2016.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-11/rson-aep111716.php

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