More fish needed for healthy heart?

Middle-aged Japanese men living in Japan had lower incidence of coronary artery calcification, a predictor of heart disease, than middle-aged white men living in the United States, after accounting for risk factors such as smoking, cholesterol, alcohol consumption, diabetes and high blood pressure.

It’s suggested that the mixed results from studies looking at the effect of fish oil on cardiovascular health are due to the substantially lower intake of omega-3 fatty acids than that found in Japanese. The average dietary intake of fish by Japanese people living in Japan is nearly 100 grams each day, compared to the average American intake of 7-13 grams a day (about one serving a week).

Japanese-Americans had levels of coronary artery calcification higher than that of the rest of the US population.

http://www.futurity.org/japans-fishy-diet-good-heart-health/

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