In women, even mild sleep problems may raise blood pressure

A study examining blood pressure and sleep habits in 323 healthy women found that those who had mild sleep problems were significantly more likely to have elevated blood pressure. Further examination of some of these women revealed an association between endothelial inflammation and mild sleep disturbances. Endothelial inflammation is a significant contributor to cardiovascular disease.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-06/cuim-iwe062618.php

[4520] Brooke, A., Nour M., Riddhi S., Memet E., Ying W., Marie‐Pierre S‐O., et al.
(2018).  Effects of Inadequate Sleep on Blood Pressure and Endothelial Inflammation in Women: Findings From the American Heart Association Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Network.
Journal of the American Heart Association. 7(12), e008590.

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