Neuroimaging categorizes 4 depression subtypes

July, 2017

A study of more than 1,100 brain scans has concluded that clinical depression can be categorized into four unique subtypes defined by distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain. These subtypes are associated with different symptom profiles and probably differ in their response to different treatments.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-12/wcm-ncf120816.php

Drysdale, A. T., Grosenick, L., Downar, J., Dunlop, K., Mansouri, F., Meng, Y., … Liston, C. (2017). Resting-state connectivity biomarkers define neurophysiological subtypes of depression. Nat Med, 23(1), 28–38. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm.4246

Related News

Previous research has indicated that about a quarter of older adults who become mildly depressed will go on to become seriously depressed within a year or two.

Problems with myelin — demyelination (seen most dramatically in MS, but also in other forms of neurodegeneration, including normal aging an

Sometime ago, I reported on a study showing that older adults could improve their memory for a future task (remembering to regularly test their blood sugar) by picturing themselves going through the process.

We know that people with depression tend to focus on, and remember, negative memories rather than positive. Interestingly, it’s not simply an emotion effect.

I have reported previously on research suggesting that rapamycin, a bacterial product first isolated from soil on Easter Island and used to help transplant patients prevent organ rejection, might improve learning and memory.

The study involved 104 healthy older adults (average age 87) participating in the Oregon Brain Aging Study.

In the last five years, three studies have linked lower neighborhood socioeconomic status to lower cognitive function in older adults. Neighborhood has also been linked to self-rated health, cardiovascular disease, and mortality.

Following several recent studies pointing to the negative effect of air pollution on children’s cognitive performance (see this April 2010 news report and

A review of 35 studies published between 1991 and 2007 has found that depression does not always lead to cognitive impairment. Part of the variability in findings may be due to inconsistent measurement and diagnosis of depression.

Amnestic mild cognitive impairment often leads to Alzheimer's disease, but what predicts aMCI?

Subscribe to Latest newsSubscribe to Latest newsSubscribe to Latest health news