vascular dementia

Migraines and headaches linked to more brain lesions in older adults

March, 2011
  • Older adults who have a history of severe headaches are more likely to have a greater number of brain lesions, but do not show greater cognitive impairment (within the study time-frame).

Lesions of the brain microvessels include white-matter hyperintensities and the much less common silent infarcts leading to loss of white-matter tissue. White-matter hyperintensities are common in the elderly, and are generally regarded as ‘normal’ (although a recent study suggested we should be less blasé about them — that ‘normal’ age-related cognitive decline reflects the presence of these small lesions). However, the degree of white-matter lesions is related to the severity of decline (including increasing the risk of Alzheimer’s), and those with hypertension or diabetes are more likely to have a high number of them.

A new study has investigated the theory that migraines might also lead to a higher number of white-matter hyperintensities. The ten-year French population study involved 780 older adults (65+; mean age 69). A fifth of the participants (21%) reported a history of severe headaches, of which 71% had migraines.

Those with severe headaches were twice as likely to have a high quantity of white-matter hyperintensities as those without headaches. However, there was no difference in cognitive performance between the groups. Those who suffered from migraines with aura (2% of the total), also showed an increased number of silent cerebral infarcts — a finding consistent with other research showing that people suffering from migraine with aura have an increased risk of cerebral infarction (or strokes). But again, no cognitive decline was observed.

The researchers make much of their failure to find cognitive impairment, but I would note that, nevertheless, the increased number of brain lesions does suggest that, further down the track, there is likely to be an effect on cognitive performance. Still, headache sufferers can take comfort in the findings, which indicate the effect is not so great that it shows up in this decade-long study.

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Heavy smoking in midlife associated with dementia in later years

November, 2010

A very large long-running study has found smoking over two packs per day in middle age more than doubled the chances of developing dementia in later life.

Data from 21,123 people, surveyed between 1978 and 1985 when in their 50s and tracked for dementia from 1994 to 2008, has revealed that those who smoked more than two packs per day in middle age had more than twice the risk of developing dementia, both Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, compared to non-smokers.

A quarter of the participants (25.4%) were diagnosed with dementia during the 23 years follow-up, of whom a little over 20% were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and nearly 8% with vascular dementia.

Former smokers, or those who smoked less than half a pack per day, did not appear to be at increased risk. Associations between smoking and dementia did not vary by race or sex.

Smoking is a well-established risk factor for stroke, and is also known to contribute to oxidative stress and inflammation.

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[1934] Rusanen, M., Kivipelto M., Quesenberry C. P., Zhou J., & Whitmer R. A.
(2010).  Heavy Smoking in Midlife and Long-term Risk of Alzheimer Disease and Vascular Dementia.
Arch Intern Med. archinternmed.2010.393 - archinternmed.2010.393.

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Factors linked to cognitive deficits in type 2 diabetes

October, 2010

Cognitive deficits and even dementia are more common in older diabetics. A new study points to three health issues that, if present, increase the risk that older diabetics will develop cognitive problems.

Type 2 diabetes is known to increase the risk of cognitive impairment in old age. Now analysis of data from 41 older diabetics (aged 55-81) and 458 matched controls in the Victoria Longitudinal Study has revealed that several other factors make it more likely that an older diabetic will develop cognitive impairment. These factors are: having higher (though still normal) blood pressure, having gait and balance problems, and/or reporting yourself to be in bad health regardless of actual problems.

Diabetes and hypertension often go together, and both are separately associated with greater cognitive impairment and dementia risk, so it is not surprising that higher blood pressure is one of the significant factors that increases risk. The other factors are less expected, although gait and balance problems have been linked to cognitive impairment in a recent study, and they may be connected to diabetes through diabetes’ effect on nerves. Negativity about one’s health may reflect emotional factors such as anxiety, stress, or depression, although depression and well-being measures were not themselves found to be mediating effects for cognitive impairment in diabetics (Do note that this study is not investigating which factors, in general, are associated with age-related cognitive impairment; it is trying to establish which factors are specifically sensitive to cognitive impairment in older diabetics).

In the U.S., type 2 diabetes occurs in over 23% of those over 60; in Canada (where this study took place) the rate is 19%. It should be noted that the participants in this study are not representative of the general population, in that they were fairly well-educated older Canadians, most of whom have benefited from a national health care system. Moreover, the study did not have longitudinal data on these various factors, meaning that we don’t know the order of events (which health problems come first? How long between the development of the different problems?). Nevertheless, the findings provide useful markers to alert diabetics and health providers.

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