Welcome to About Memory!

 

This site is primarily focused on reporting on cognitive and brain research, providing the evidence-based foundations for the articles on Mempowered, and my books.

For more user-friendly advice about improving your memory, or dealing with cognitive problems, go to my companion website Mempowered.

Aging

Data from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study, involving 6,467 postmenopausal women (65+) who reported some level of caffeine consumption, has found that those who consumed above average amounts of coffee had a lower risk of developing dementia.

Posted: Fri, 17 March 2017

Alzheimers

A study comparing the language abilities of 22 healthy young individuals, 24 healthy older individuals and 22 people with

Posted: Tue, 21 March 2017

Problems

Chemo-brain common among women with breast cancer

Posted: Mon, 20 March 2017

How memory works

We've all done it: used the wrong name when we know the right one perfectly well. And we all know when it's most likely to happen. But here's a study come to reassure us that it's okay, this is just how we roll.

Posted: Fri, 13 May 2016

Strategies

Sleep, as I have said on many occasions, helps your brain consolidate new memories. I have reported before on a number of studies showing how sleep helps the learning of various types of new information.

Posted: Wed, 17 February 2016

Lifestyle

Data from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study, involving 6,467 postmenopausal women (65+) who reported some level of caffeine consumption, has found that those who consumed above average amounts of coffee had a lower risk of developing dementia.

Posted: Fri, 17 March 2017

Study

Four studies involving a total of more than 300 younger adults (20-24) have looked at information processing on different forms of media.

Posted: Tue, 17 May 2016

Children

Untreated sleep apnea in children shrinks brain & may slow development

Brain scans of children who have moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea have found significant reductions of gray matter across the brain.

Posted: Tue, 21 March 2017